Publications

Background: Female sex workers (FSWs) are extremely vulnerable to adverse sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes. To mitigate these risks, they require access to services covering not only HIV prevention but also contraception, cervical cancer screening and sexual violence. To develop context-specific intervention packages to improve uptake, we identified gaps in service utilization in four different cities

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Abstract
Background: Maternal mortality remains a daunting problem in Mozambique and many other low-resource countries. High quality antenatal care (ANC) services can improve maternal and newborn health outcomes and increase the likelihood that women will seek skilled delivery care. This study explores the factors influencing provider uptake of the recommended package of ANC interventions in Mozambique.

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Background: Maternal mortality remains a daunting problem in Mozambique and many other low-resource countries. High quality antenatal care (ANC) services can improve maternal and newborn health outcomes and increase the likelihood that women will seek skilled delivery care. This study explores the factors influencing provider uptake of the recommended package of ANC interventions in Mozambique.

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Objective: To evaluate known risk factors for stillbirth and identify local priorities for stillbirth prevention among institutional deliveries in Tete, Mozambique.

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Objective: To evaluate known risk factors for stillbirth and identify local priorities for stillbirth prevention among institutional deliveries in Tete, Mozambique.

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Background
Although substantiated by little evidence, concerns about zidovudine-related anaemia in pregnancy have influenced antiretroviral (ARV) regimen choice for preventing mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1, especially in settings where anaemia is common

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ABSTRACT Mozambique continues to face many challenges in HIV and maternal and child health care (MCH). Community-based antiretroviral treatment groups (CAG) enhance retention to care among members, but whether such benets extend to their families and to MCH remains unclear. In we studied utilization of HIV and MCH services among CAG members and their family aggregates in Changara, Mozambique, through a mixed-method assessment.

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Count data are very common in health services research, and very commonly the basic Poisson regression model has to be extended in several ways to accommodate several sources of heterogeneity: (i) an excess number of zeros relative to a Poisson distribution, (ii) hierarchical structures, and correlated data, (iii) remaining “unexplained” sources of overdispersion. In this paper, we propose hierarchical zero-inflated and overdispersed models with independent, correlated, and shared random effects for both components of the mixture model. We show that all different extensions of the Poisson model can be based on the concept of mixture models, and that they can be combined to account for all different sources of heterogeneity. Expressions for the first two moments are derived and discussed. The models are applied to data on maternal deaths and related risk factors within health facilities in Mozambique. The final model shows that the maternal mortality rate mainly depends on the geographical location of the health facility, the percentage of women admitted with HIV and the percentage of referrals from the health facility.

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Background: The follow-up of HIV-exposed infants remains a public health challenge in many Sub-Saharan countries. Just as integrated antenatal and maternity services have contributed to improved care for HIV-positive pregnant women, so too could integrated care for mother and infant after birth improve follow-up of HIV-exposed infants. We present results of a study testing the viability of such integrated care, and its effects on follow-up of HIV-exposed infants, in Tete Province, Mozambique.

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There is little information about the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in pregnant women in Mozambique. In Tete, a province in the country's northwest, recent data are not available. However, the province's Directorate of Health reported an antenatal clinic (ANC) attendance rate of nearly 100%. This study set out to assess the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (G) and syphilis in pregnant women attending urban health centres.
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